Story Robes

  • Story robes were used to keep track of history for many First Nations people.  Usually the most important event of the year would have been drawn on the back of a buffalo hide.  These stories were about important battles.  Over time, the story robe would be like a journal for the Blackfoot people. 

 

  • For other people, the different parts of the story robe would tell a story.  Because the First Nations people did not have a written alphabet, pictures would tell the story.   Stories were also drawn on tipi covers and liners.  The stories would be drawn by people who had the story told to them, or by people who experienced the story themselves.

 

Real Story Robes

 Take a look at some of these story robes and their stories.

Photo courtesy the Glenbow Museum

This story is about Chief Calf and the party of seven warriors. Once some riders who were out gathering their horses spotted some Cree on foot trying to chase off part of the herd. Chief Calf and his party wasted no time and pursued the intruders on their fastest horses. They caught up to them at a lake. Riding fast, shooting, and yelling, the Bloods quickly killed two of the Cree. The other ran to another lake, pursued by Chief Calf. At the second lake the Cree ran into the water, but Chief Calf followed him and stabbed him in the heart.

 

There are six different stories on this robe.  To find out more about the stories that this robe tells, click here.

 

 

Click here to read this incredible story about this story robe... that almost went into the garbage!

 

 

Make your own!

Make your own story robe!  Click below to find out how!

http://www.i-craft.com/crafts98/bufrobe.html

Click below to see some of the amazing story robes made by Parkdale Elementary students!

Room three's Story Robes

First Nations Legends

The students from Parkdale Elementary created their own legends based on what we discovered about the legends of the First Nations people. 

Click below to see some of the amazing legends we wrote and performed using claymation.

Our claymation movies!

The Legend of the Dream Catcher

Although the legend of the dream catcher is not traditionally a Blackfoot legend, many First Nation people enjoy making dream catchers as a way to celebrate their culture. 

Click here to see some of the amazing dream catchers made by grades two and three students from Parkdale Elementary School.

Click below to read the Ojibwa legend of the dream catcher.

http://www.angelfire.com/ny4/HOMEPAGE/writings/dcatcher.html

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Farm/7747/dream.html

http://www.cornsilks.com/legenddreamcatcher.html

 

Legends From Many Nations

Click below to read some traditional First Nations Legends from many different nations.  Think about..

  • What are legends?

  • Why did the First Nations people write legends?

  • What kinds of things are the same from legend to legend?

  • Why were they important to the First Nations people?

 

 Chief Mountain Blackfoot

 Old Man and the Beginning of the World Blackfoot

 Old Man and Old Woman Blackfoot

 Old Man and the Squirrels Blackfoot

 The Sacred Buffalo Stone Blackfoot

 Buffalo and the Mouse
 Origin of the Buffalo Dance Blackfoot
 Comrades
 The Raccoon and the Bee-Tree
 Big Long Mans Corn Patch
 How Coyote Stole Fire
 The Frog and the Crane
 The Falcon and the Duck
 How Fly Saved the River Anishnabeg
 Geow-lud-mo-sis-eg : Little People Maliseet
 How Glooskap Found the Summer
 The Origin of Light Inuit
 The Magic Arrows
 The Runnaways
 The Legend of Wountie Squamish
 The Snake with the Big Feet
 Ravens Great Adventure
 Porcupine Hunts Buffalo
 The Legend of the Bear Family
 Coyote and the Rolling Rock
 MicMac Creation Story Mic Mac
 How Bear Lost His Tail
 Ableegumooch, the Lazy Rabbit
 Buffalo and Eagle Wing
 Coyote and Multnomah Falls
 The Hungry Fox and His Boastful Suitor
 Raven and His Grandmother
 Blessed Gift of Joy is Bestowed Upon Man
 Yellowstone Valley and the Great Flood Cheyenne
 Origin of the Lakotas Peace Pipe Lakota
 Mooin, The Bear's Child
 The Buffalo Dance Mandan
 Bluebird and the Coyote
 Apache Creation Lore Apache
 The Origin of Earth Tuskegee
 How the Old Man Made People
 Origin of the Iroquois Nation Iroquois
 Spider Rock Dine/Navajo
 Eagle Stories
 Rabbit and Fox
 Grandfather Stories
 California Creation Lore Yokut
 When the Animals and Birds were Created Makah
 Men Visit the Sky Seminole
 Origin of Medicine Men Passamaquoddy
 Yellow Jacket and Ant NezPrece/Nee-me-Poo
 Coyote and the Monster of Kamiah NezPrece/Nee-me-Poo
 Mt. Shasta Grizzly Legend
 The Buffalo Rock
 In the Beginning
 Buffalo Woman, a Story of Magic Caddo
 How the Buffalo Hunt Began Cheyenne
 How the Buffalo Were Released on Earth
 Bear Legend Cherokee
 Puma and the Bear
 Chipmunk and Bear
 The White Faced Bear
 Coyote and the Another One
 Creation of the First Indians Chelan
 Creation of the Red and White Races
 How Rabbit Brought Fire to the People
 The First Fire Cherokee
 The Story of Creation Diguenos
 The Great Flood Salish
 How the Hopi Indians Reached Their World Hopi
 The Hunting of the Great Bear
 The Coyote and the Hen Mayan
 In the Beginning Yuchi
 The Ancient One
 Godasiyo the Woman Chief Seneca
 The First Moccasins
 The Flood on Superstition Mountain Pima
 How Corn Came to the Earth
 How the Great Chiefs Made the Moon and the Sun Hopi
 Why Mount Shasta Erupted Shasta
 Men Visit the Sky Seminole
 Origin of Fire Jicarilla Apache
 Coyote and the Monsters of the Bitterroot Valley Flathead
 How Rabbit Fooled Alligator Creek
 The Origin of Game and of Corn Cherokee
 Coyote Kills a Giant
 The Origin of Medicine Cherokee
 The Origin of Summer and Winter Acoma/Laguna
 Origin of the Animals Jicarilla-Apache
 Origin of the Buffalo Cheyenne
 Coyote's Adventures in Idaho
 How Rabbit Fooled Wolf
Origin of the Clans Hopi
Origin of the Sweat Lodge Blackfeet/Piegan
 The Origin of the Thunderbird Passamaquoddy
 The Origin of the Winds Aleuts
 Coyote vs. Duck
 Turtle's Race With Bear Seneca
 How the Rabbit Lost His Tail
 Battle With the Snakes Iroquois
 Origin of Tu-Tok-A-Nu-La Yosemite
 The Origin of Yosemite Miwok
 At The Rainbow's End Dine/Navajo
 Seek Your Father Seneca
 The Strange Origin of Corn Abnaki
 The Warm Wind Brothers vs. The Cold Wind Brothers
Coyote's Salmon Sanpoils
 Rabbit and Otter, The Bungling Host
 Why the North Star Stands Still Paiute
 Rabbit and the Moon Man Micmac
 Fire Race Karuk
 Rabbit Calls a Truce
 The Man and the Ravens Anishinabe
 Rabbit and The Coyote
 Rabbit shoots the Sun
 Great Serpent and the Great Flood Chippewa
 Skunk Outwits Coyote
 Run, Rabbit, Run
 Why the Opussum's Tail Is Bare Cherokee
 Two Fawns and a Rabbit
 The Story of Jumping Mouse
 The White Potato Clan Creek
 Tahina-Ca Caraja, South America
 The Twin Brothers Caddo
 Grandmother Spider Steals the Fire Choctaw
 Old Man at the Beginning Crow
 Race with Buffalo Cheyenne
 Bears' Lodge Kiowa
 The Four Brothers, or Inyanhoksila (Stone Boy) Sioux
 The Unktomi (Spider), Two Widows, And The Red Plums Sioux
 The Great Flood Ottawa
 Cricket and Cougar Alta and Baja Tribes of California
 Ghost of the White Deer Chickasaw
 The Resuscitation Of The Only Daughter Sioux
 Origin Of Our Tribal Flower, The Trailing Arbutus Ottawa
 Dance of the Dead Luiseño
 Little People of the Cherokee Cherokee
 Warriors of the Rainbow
 Tatanka Hunkesi : The Wisdom of Experience
 The Hunter & The Dakwa Cherokee
 Origin of Tobacco Crow and Hidatsa
 THE PET DONKEY Sioux
 THE FORGOTTEN EAR OF CORN Sioux
 THE HERMIT, OR THE GIFT OF CORN Sioux
 Legend of the Cedar Tree Cherokee
 The Wolf Dance
 Hero with the Horned Snakes Cherokee
 Return of Ice Man Cherokee
 A LITTLE BRAVE AND THE MEDICINE WOMAN Sioux
 STORY OF THE LOST WIFE Sioux
 THE ARTICHOKE AND THE MUSKRAT Sioux
 THE STORY OF THE PET CRANE Sioux
 The Origin of Strawberries Cherokee
 THE MYSTERIOUS BUTTE Sioux
 UNKTOMI AND THE ARROWHEADS Sioux
 

 

 

 

Calgary Board of Education Home Page
All contents copyright © 2003, C.B.E. All rights reserved.
Web Author: M. Speight

Last updated March 19, 2003

Main Page Home Page The People Tipis The Buffalo
Regalia Story Robes Dancing Power Point Presentations Credits and Acknowledgements
    Just for Teachers