Why do this, NASA?

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"You learn from your mistakes..." quoted Thomas Edison.

Do we, really? So it will always be one lose, one win? Take the previous missions to Mars, for example. The first few sent out by NASA were unsuccessful, which was expected, because, after all, they were the first. Then the missions go in a predictable rotation of successes and failures. Why though? Why does NASA send out a mission every possible time? Rushing and being impatient. We know that mistakes are unavoidable in doing something, but really, the records of the missions are pitiful. Absolutely pitiful. If you count the successes and failures up, then you would find that the failures almost outnumber the successes. When we read an account of one of the previous missions, it seemed to us as if they were just rushing it through, on a very, very tight schedule. Of course, you have to have some kind of time management, but what if, by the time of the intended departure, the mission wasn't ready? Technically, the instruments would be all set to go by then, but would the people of NASA be ready? Self-prepared, and fully capable of conducting the mission? We don't think so. Doing something this important to the world, takes a lot of self-esteem. Plus, there is approximately 85 million dollars invested in the mission. And that is one large chunk of US money. I mean, ouch, can you imagine putting something that expensive out in space when you're not completely sure that it's going to work? Uh, no. Not really. It would be sacrificing a huge amount of money. And what are people complaining about? Money. So don't just throw it all down the drain. That, being all stated, is why we believe that NASA should dedicate more time to each individual mission.

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