Canadian Shield

by Kate, Navneet, and Simone

Canadian Shield

Introduction

Did you ever wonder why people live where they live? The purpose of this report is to explain why people live where they live in Canada. In order to answer this question, we researched the Canadian Shield region of Canada. We examined the geography, climate, vegetation, wildlife, occupations, sport and recreation and the people of this region.

Geography

The Canadian Shield region of Canada is a big region. It is the largest sub-region in the northern region of the country. It is 4.8-billon square km in area. It is located in northeast Alberta, northern Saskatchewan, northern Manitoba, southern N.W.T, Ontario (except for the peninsula), Quebec and Labrador. The largest bodies of water in this region are Great Slave Lake, Lake Athabasca, Reindeer Lake and part of Lake Superior. There are also many rivers in this region. The landscape in this region can be described as rocky with many different types of bodies of water.

Climate

The climate of the Canadian Shield is different than ours in Southern Alberta. The climate in the northern part of the Canadian Shield is long, cold winters and short, warm summers. The southern part of the Canadian Shield has cold, snowy winters and warm summers. The southern part of the Canadian Shield has between 300 mm and 1600 mm of rain and snow each year. The northern part of the Canadian Shield has less than 300 mm of rain and snow each year.

Vegetation

The vegetation in the Canadian Shield region of Canada is very different than the rest of Canada. The vegetation of the Canadian Shield is mostly trees. There are many types of trees in the Canadian Shield. Some of the trees are coniferous trees and deciduous. It is all mixed in the southern part of the Canadian Shield. The forests are mixed with birch trees, aspen trees, tamarack trees, black and white spruce tress, willow trees, hemlock trees, pine trees and balsam fir tress. The mixed forests are beautiful in the fall when the leaves of the deciduous trees change color.

Wildlife

The Canadian Shield region of Canada has lots of animals. Some of the animals are moose, black bears, grizzly bears, wolves, foxes, beavers, minks, martens, wolverines, lynxes, wood buffalo, woodland caribou, shrews, weasels and hares. The Canadian Shield has many different types of wildlife that make the area their home because they can find enough food, water and shelter there.

Occupations

In the Canadian Shield region there are not many jobs. In the Canadian Shield the biggest industry is forestry. Another industry that is found in the Canadian Shield is mining. One final occupation found in the Canadian Shield is farming. These occupations provide people with enough money to have food and shelter.

Sports and Recreation

The Canadian Shield does not have that many sports. One of the major sports is hockey and another major sport is skiing. Snowmobiling, fishing and hunting are also favorite pastimes. These are popular sports because of the weather in the Canadian Shield.

People

The Canadian Shield has many cultural groups. One of the first cultural groups was the Inuit. The Canadian Shield's main cultural groups are from Europe. There are both French and English people. These cultural groups live together in the Canadian Shield.

Conclusion

Why have people chosen to live in the Canadian Shield region of Canada? There are many reasons why. Some of these reasons include the weather. The weather in the Canadian Shield is cold in the winter and people like to ski, go snowmobiling and play ice hockey. The animals are another reason why people want to live in the Canadian Shield. They might want to fish or they might want to hunt for bears. The vegetation in the Canadian Shield might be another reason why people want to live there. The occupations are also an important reason why people live in the Canadian Shield and the large cities like Quebec City are a popular place to live. As you can see, the Canadian Shield region has much to offer to the people who choose to live there.

Last modified: December 2003

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